Calling all marketing people who work with content people, and all content people who work with marketing people

Update: I wrote this post and survey with last year’s CS Forum in mind, but this year I’m bringing this talk to Confab Central in June! Between now and then I’d love as many contributions as I can get.

If you work in marketing, or with content, you can tell me all about it and help me with a cool thing I’m doing. Please?

Awesome news: I’m speakingI spoke at CS Forum in Melbourne, this October! last year! I’m I was really stoked to be in the line-up again after four years, and only slightly intimidated by the company I‘mwas in.

Even awesomer, this June I’ll be at Confab Central with the latest version of the same talk, which is called Content people and marketing people: It’s complicated. The idea came from the way I’ve worked as a content guy in three companies, each with very different ways of structuring their marketing and content/digital functions, but none of which seem ideal.1 Is this relationship destined to be painful, or are there ways to make it work? I want to ask around, find out, and tell a big roomful of people all about it.

Here’s the part you can play: I need to know more. I need to hear more stories and opinions (all of which I’ll keep anonymous, of course). So, if you spend your work days on either side of the content/marketing relationship, for any sort of company or organisation, I’d love to hear about it. If you’re up for a half-hour interview, email max [at] contentistheweb [dot] com. Or the quicker option is this quick(ish) survey (use that link if you can’t see the embedded version below):

Create your own user feedback survey

Thanks so much!


1. For the record, those three structures are:

  • “See no marketing, hear no marketing”, in which the teams are strucurally miles apart and hardly even talk to each other
  • “Compulsory friends, like when your parents knew people with kids your age and you ended up spending heaps of time with those kids whether you liked it or not”. In this case the teams share no budget or management, and only some goals, but are expected to cooperate and have found ways to grudgingly do so
  • “Master/slave”, in which one reports to the other (guess which way round).

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