Notes on content strategy and UX overlap

I’ve started reusing an oldish notebook recently, and these two pages (ripped out of a hotel notepad) just dropped out of it. They date back to the week before I wrote Content strategy and UX are twins. This was the thinking that started me down that path, but it kind of got lost somewhere along the way. So here are the raw-form thoughts.

Yes, I have two distinct styles of handwriting. No, I only have one personality.

The two three two things you can do online:

  • consume information
  • interact with systems or people (including create).

i.e. absorb information passively, or exchange active input for output (calculated, social, buying things, whatever).

Content strategy is traditionally concerned with:

  1. consumption: making information easier to consume, and
  2. archiving the results of interaction.

UX is traditionally concerned with interaction as it happens.

BUT interactions need a lasting impression to be good experiences (if the shopping cart is great, but the stuff I bought never gets dispatched = fail).

AND consumption is a [user] experience.

AND interaction affects content.

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If we’ve developed professional specialities based on how passive or active the user is, we risk forgetting the way people slip between consumption and interaction. Do you go to Facebook to read, to interact, or both? It’s both a content experience and an interaction experience. This is why UX specialists and content strategists are twins – we’re working together on what, to users, is a single experience.

In cases where there’s an offline aspect as well – as with shopping online – even a perfect online experience counts for zilch if the offline experience sucks. The twins of UX and content strategy need a close sibling taking care of people in the real world, too.

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This post is 274 words long, with an average reading grade of 9.3.

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