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Content strategy Governance and workflow

A working definition of content governance

I have a new job, working remotely as the Director of Content for a fast-growing tech company (SaaS, basically). I’ve come in as the workforce is clicking up somewhere between 100 and 200. This is the size where organisations outgrow workable informality. Meanwhile, as a remote team member, I’m experimenting with internal blog posts as a form of working out loud. This is the first such post that I’ve modified for Content is the Web. It started when I was asked some quite general questions about content governance. It’s a recognised weakness (because informality hasn’t been an issue yet), and it’s more or less my responsibility now. Like any good content strategist though, I ain’t touching any problem until I’ve defined the shit out of it.

Categories
Content strategy Governance and workflow

What Twitter thought of ‘Marketing people and content people: It’s complicated’ at CS Forum

I love presenting at conferences. Love it. I love picking a topic and spending hours thinking about it. I love having a reason to read up on stuff that interests me. I love that when you say to someone, “I’m working on a talk and I’d like to hear your thoughts on [topic x]”, they almost always give up time for a chat. At events, being a speaker is a great way to meet people. At CS Forum (which was great, by the way), someone found me during a coffee break and opened with, “Hi, you made me really angry,” but with a smile on her face. I love seeing and hearing reactions to what I present. I love it all.

Except the post-conference wrap up blog post. I don’t love that bit. It’s hard, and it takes longer than I want it to, and especially after the best conferences, it drags back the post-event blues that you get for a couple of days afterwards.

Last week I was at CS Forum with a presentation called ‘Marketing people and content people: It’s complicated’. It was a brilliant conference. My talk was fun. It seemed like people got something out of it, which is the result you want as a speaker. The slides are embedded at the bottom of this post.

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Content strategy Governance and workflow Risk management

Making risk management work (4): The tools you need

This post is part of the Content Is The Web risk management series.

This post explains the tools and tables you’ll use to manage risks properly. It follows on from earlier posts about the framework and conversations that risk management uses.

The short version:

Each risk is documented in a separate report, and each piece of content you work on needs a register of all its risks. So long as you’re having the right conversations and following the framework, this is basic admin.

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Content strategy Governance and workflow Risk management

Making risk management work (3): The framework

This post is part of the Content Is The Web risk management series.

Update, 13 Sept 2014: I finally got around to adding in the five steps a risk goes through.

Risk management replaces your old sign-off process. As part 2 explained, it changes what you ask as you work though content with other people. Once you have a big pile of information from these risk reporters, this post explains how to sort through it all. The next post introduces some of the tools you’ll use.

The risk management framework makes the entire process as objective as it can be. It rates each risk’s likelihood and consequence on separate scales, then produces a severity measurement. This determines how acceptable the risk is (or isn’t), and shows you what risks are most important.

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Content strategy Governance and workflow Risk management

Making risk management work (2): Holding conversations

This post is part of the Content Is The Web risk management series.

You know the roles and definitions that risk management is based on, so now we turn to how to talk about risks with your risk reporters. After that, the next post introduces the tools you need to manage them.

(Risk reporters used to be stakeholders and points of sign-off. If that’s news to you, let me repeat the link to How risk management works (1) – Roles and definitions.)

It’s your decision to talk to risk reporters one-by-one, or all together as a group. It’s most important, especially at first, that you do actually talk. The old days of sending drafts and receiving tracked changes or free-form comments are over.

Categories
Content strategy Governance and workflow Risk management

Making risk management work (1): Roles and definitions

This post is part of the Content Is The Web risk management series.

So you already know that your sign-off process slows things down and makes it difficult to work with others. But you still need some way to hear everyone who should have a say, and to make sure that your web content is fit for purpose before you publish it.

Here’s something I picked up from an employer that could never guarantee 100% safety to everyone – the armed forces. It’s a risk management system, and it lets you gather more detailed information than you get from a typical sign-off process, while keeping you in control of your content.